The Teochew Store Blog / photography

Teochew Short Film 潮语微电影: Trivia concerns in a Southern City《南城小事》

A young man recently graduated from a photography course struggles between a desire to remain with his parents in a small village in Teochew or to pursue a career in Beijing. He tries to find an answer through his family and friends. This film discusses a dilemma faced by numerous young Teochews today.

时逢冬至,毕业寻工作未果的阿浩回到家乡,父亲仍对阿浩高考报读摄影专业心存芥蒂,想要在家乡开照相馆的想法遭到父亲的反对。朋友相聚也显生分。母亲的碎语唠叨,父亲的隐忍关爱,阿浩在归家与离家间惆怅迷惘。短短数日,阿浩游走故乡,每个人都在用自己的方式诠释着生活的滋味,阿浩终在浓浓的山水人情中体会到了父亲多年来默默无闻的甘苦。离家那日,父亲送阿浩去车站,阿浩望着父亲渐渐远去的背影,思绪再次萦绕心头…

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Teochew Documentary: Teochew Documentary: Salute to Teochew 致敬潮汕

A stunning video capturing spectacular aerial views of present Teochew region.
 
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Teochew Documentary: Town, Country & Seaside Life Round about Swatow, Chaochowfu and Swabue (1935)

Watch this fascinating silent film Town, Country & Seaside Life Round about Swatow, Chaochowfu* and Swabue, and gaze into how people back in 1935 loaded salt on the beach, set up stage for a Teochew opera, built boats, made ropes, bring in their catch from the sea, chopped wood, sold prawns and fish, carry pigs, made bricks, plaster wall, forge metal, clean oyster and spin fishing net.
There are also rare glimpses into the old Teo-Swa railway, and not to forget images of how our grandparents were dressed back then! 
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This is Life in Shantou - Changing with Times, Shaping His Life Path

A special series of articles about ordinary people living in Swatow, written by students from Shantou University (STU) Cheung Kong School of Journalism

by Lv Shanshan

Bustling with traffic and pedestrians, Little Park, an older district of Shantou, was busy as usual on a recent winter day. “Drawing, Photography, Video”—A red signboard stood on the first floor of Wang Yulong’s shop. Starting as a self-taught painter, then a sent-down youth, a photographer and a business owner, Wang’s life path had been closely linked with China’s rapid changes....

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Swatow History: The Arcade Buildings & Their Architectural Style 潮汕鄉情:汕頭老市區騎樓和建築風格

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Swatow History: Stories Behind the Old Shops at Little Park 潮汕鄉情:汕頭小公園店鋪個故事

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Through the Eye of a Master Photographer (III) - The Years Before The Cultural Revolution

If we could foresee the dark clouds in life, what would we do differently for the sake of ourselves, or for our children? For those of us who have weathered the worst tempests, we know that this is only a hypothetical question.

When Teochew-born photographer Hang Tsi-kuang (Han Zhiguang 韓志光) capture the stunning picture of a lone man walking by the sea with dark clouds gathering like mountains in the background in 1951, he could not have imagined the turmoil that would ravage the whole of China for the next three decades.

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Through the Eye of a Master Photographer (II) - 1949 the Historical Year of Liberation

"Jubilation" would hardly seem like the correct word to describe the mood of the masses when Mao Zedong's Red Army marched into the Teochew region in 1949. After all the Teochews are a people known above all for their business acumen and the chief port Swatow was China's shining model of capitalistic and modern progress in the 1930s.

Yet beaming jubilation was the very emotion shown on many faces captured by the camera of photographer Hang Tsi-kuang in the historical year of liberation. Gripped by intense fear for their livelihood as the value of the money in their pockets plummeted each day under the Kuomintang government, hope was all the common people looked for. In their eyes the triumphant entry of the communists was not the takeover of a peasant army, but about them becoming part of an army of peasants to change the world order

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Through the Eye of a Master Photographer (I) - 15 Vivid Images of Life around the Teochew Region in 1948

In the first of three presentations of photographs by acclaimed photographer Hang Tsi-kuang 韓志光 (1917-2011), we bring to you 15 vivid images of the Teochew region and its surroundings taken in 1948 - the year when the Kuomintang was in the last moments of power as government of China, and a time when common people were left to their own devices to survive in a society barely-recovered from the ravages of Japanese occupation, and struggling with abject poverty, hyperinflation, and uncertainty for the future.
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Making Sense of Teochew Opera - the Young Shoulders that bore a 500-year-old Tradition

Teochew opera is said to have over 1200 traditional plays that fall into two broad categories - those adapted from the 12th century nanxi 南戲 from Southeast China as well as chuanqi 傳奇, and others derived popular local lores including romance tales and ghost stories... The most dramatic episodes however were the ones played out behind the scenes that were summed up by this Qing Qianlong era (1736 to 1796) saying:

"父母無修飾,賣仔去做戲。鼓樂聲聲響,目汁垂垂滴。" 
“Parents uneducated in morals, sell their children to act in shows. The sounds of music ring aloud, the tears drip one by one.”
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Teochew Celebration of the Chinese New Year in Pictures【光影潮州】乡里热闹的春节

 

For the Teochews, the Chinese New Year is the grandest and most important festive period. All across the Teochew region, people mark the occasion with activities strongly rooted in local tradition. Through the camera lens of avid photographer Ling Shyue Miin, we bring you a series of extraordinary images capturing how villages in Teochew welcome the Year of the Monkey.

在潮州传统的节日中,春节是最热闹、最受潮州人重视的节日。作为农历一年中的第一个大节,潮州地区有着许多别具特色的民俗文化活动。2016猴年春节,资深摄影师凌学敏走访了许多潮州村庄,用相机记录下了乡村里热闹的春节。

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The Bridge We Must Have All Seen - Its Stories & Photos Through the Years

The Siang-ze kie 湘子橋 (Xiangzi Bridge, according to standard Mandarin), alternatively known as Guang-zi kie bridge廣濟橋 (Guangji Bridge), located outside the historical Teochew prefectural city’s eastern gate is arguably the Teochew region’s most recognisable landmark. It straddles the magnificent Hangkang韓江 (Han River), creating a picturesque postcard scene familiar to many of us, even overseas Teochews who have yet to visit.
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